Wild Vistas of the Southern Eyre Peninsula

Posted by Crooked Compass

Straw coloured islands lay scattered in the deep blues of the Southern Ocean juxtaposed with translucent silica beaches, fringed with Bombay Sapphire waters - this is the Eyre Peninsula. A wild coastline, home to graceful Southern Right Whales, curious Australian sealions and misunderstood Great White Sharks. Welcome to some of Australia's most dramatic ocean escarpment.

Louth Island off the coast of Port Lincoln - Photo Credit Crooked Compass
Louth Island off the coast of Port Lincoln - Photo Credit Crooked Compass

Can you picture yourself here? Perched on the edge of Australia, gazing across turquoise hues to nowhere, sea breeze whipping through your hair, salt tingling your skin. Your senses are alive as you devour lunch with not another soul in sight. This is paradise found.

Lunch on the edge of the world, Lower Eyre Peninsula
Lunch on the edge of the world, Lower Eyre Peninsula - Photo Credit Australian Coastal Safaris

Turn around 180 degrees and your new vista is completely contradicted by what was just before you. A small mob of emu, slink their way through the undulating dunes. Remove our native birds from the scene, and you could be mistaken thinking you were in Sossusvlei, Namibia.

Wild emus stalk their way through the rolling sand dunes - Photo Credit: Crooked Compass
Wild emus stalk their way through the rolling sand dunes - Photo Credit Crooked Compass

Venture a little further around the western coastline and you will reach the Great Australian Bight - rough, rugged and spectacularly beautiful. Limestone cliffs wind along 200km and tower approx 80m above the untamed sea. The ocean roars, waves crash. Seabirds glide, wildflowers flutter.

Wild ocean at the Great Australia Bight
Wild ocean at the Great Australia Bight - Photo Credit Crooked Compass

The impressive rock formations at Whaler's Way are worth the adventure on a clear day. Brimming with native wildlife, drive down a dusty track before exploring further on foot where you will witness some of the oldest rock formations on the planet. The ocean here can be aggressively beautiful. If the weather is right, long nosed fur seals may be seen splashing around and for adventurous souls, bring your swimming costume, as there are hidden picturesque rock pools to explore!

Whalers Way, exploring hidden caves and rockpools
Whalers Way, exploring hidden caves and rockpools - Photo Credit Kerstin Rheinlander

A gem of Lincoln National Park, is the aptly named Wedding Cake Island. With wild water dancing around the cliff base, this is the location to whip out your binoculars in search for birdlife. Also keep your eyes peeled for long nosed fur seals and sharks that may be tailing close behind!

Wedding Cake and The one Apostle, home to a nest of Ospreys
Wedding Cake and the One Apostle, home to a nest of Ospreys - Photo Credit Crooked Compass

Tucked away in Coffin Bay National Park, is the treasure of Almonta Beach. Think the whitest of white sands, the bluest of blue waters, fascinating and tragic history paired with an array of wildlife including kangaroos, emus and seabirds. The contrasts of this coastline continue to 'wow'.

Almonta Beach, Point Avoid, Coffin Bay National Park - Photo Credit Crooked Compass
Almonta Beach, Point Avoid, Coffin Bay National Park - Photo Credit Crooked Compass

As cliffs drop away into the ocean, azure waters swirl and landscapes morph before your eyes, the wild beauty and sheer remoteness of the Southern Eyre Peninsula hooks you in and sticks with you. Something about this region embeds itself into your soul, luring you back the second you depart. Tempting you to explore further, knowing there is something even more beautiful to discover when you return.

The colours and contrasts of the Southern Eyre Peninsula
The colours and contrasts of the Southern Eyre Peninsula - Photo Credit Crooked Compass

Make this experience yours and join our Wildlife, Culture and Seafood small group tour!